Satellites

Layers of haze covering Saturn’s satellite Titan are seen in this image taken by Voyager 1 on Nov. 12, 1980 at a range of 22,000 kilometers (13,700 miles). The colors are false and are used to show details of the haze that covers Titan. The upper level of the thick aerosol above the satellite’s limb appears orange. The divisions in the haze occur at altitudes of 200, 375 and 500 kilometers (124, 233 and 310 miles) above the limb of the moon. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA’s Office of Space Science.

On today’s At Water’s Edge program, we explore satellites–both the technical and celestial varieties.

Apologies, dear listeners! The podcast recording itself failed, but here are the program notes….

===SATELLITES===

1. ansiform – Satellite (4:00)
(Satellite, Ansiform, 2007)

ansiform is a nebulous, anonymous collective of artists dedicated to creating subtle soundtracks for your most sedate endeavors. the ansiform style of ambient revolves around unobtrusive, highly-textured, beatless soundscapes — aural wallpaper to complement any calm environment.

2. Echoes From Satellite 1033883 – Cousin Silas (2:27)
(The Snow Imposed Silence, BFW Recordings, 2010)

Cousin Silas was born in 1959 and raised in the Colne Valley in West Yorkshire. He draws inspiration from such diverse sources as JG Ballard, Fortean events, memories and Brian Eno.

http://www.bfwrecordings.com/releases/CousinSilas-TheSnowImposedSilence.php

3. Sleeping Satellites – Michael Trommer (7:46)
(Sleeping Satellites, Test Tube, 2007)

Canadian composer Michael Trommer released Sleeping Satellites in 2007. It’s a lush collection of space ambient, which seems perfect for today’s program…!

http://testtube.monocromatica.com/releases/tube072.htm

4. An Orbiting Satellite – Susperia-Electrica (5:54)
(Turmoil, Earth Mantra, 2010)

Susperia-Electrica is an ambient electronic artist, composer and producer hailing from Sussex in the United Kingdom. Nick Fortune has been releasing music under the name of Susperia-Electrica since 2008.

http://www.susperia-electrica.com/

http://www.earthmantra.com/artist-detail.php?id=62

5. Something in the Sky – Arcticology (12:19)
(Looking for Satellites, Earth Mantra, 2008)

Ambient artist Dale Humphries, hailing from Bournemouth, United Kingdom, is a composer of lush detailed electronic ambient music.

Dale began releasing his beautiful ambient work as a student under the Arcticology name in 2007. Beginning with his seminal release Looking For Satellites, Dale has since gone on to release several additional albums, all of which are essential listening for any fan of ambient music.

Despite the very high quality of his work, Dale makes all of his music available under the Creative Commons license, so it is freely enjoyable by everyone.

http://www.arcticology.com

http://www.earthmantra.com/artist-detail.php?id=24

===MOONS OF SATURN===

6. Titan – Bing Satellites (18:36)
(Twilight Sessions Volume Three, BFW Recordings, 2010)

How can we do a show on Satellites without featuring the music of Bing Satellites? And in a lovely convergence, this track is about a different sort of satellite, that of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon.

Bing Satellites is known in real life as Brin. He creates mostly ambient music under the name Bing Satellites, most of which is available as free/name-your-price downloads. He also creates ambient music as The Ambient Visitor, The Lovely Moon, and harder electronic music as Blocker.

http://www.bingsatellites.com

7. TITAN, Beneath The Liquid Hydrocarbon Sea – Voyager; Audio Log (7:28)
IO, Lava Flow
(Voyager; Audio Log, 2007)

These are experimental tracks built on, as you might guess, the audio logs from Voyager as it made its way out of our solar system.

8. Landing On Titan – Phrozenlight (69:26)
(Landing on Titan, Phrozenlight, 2007)

Phrozenlight is Dutch composer Bert Hülshoff, whose specialty is a blend of space electronica, and especially analog-type sounds…I’m a fan. This long-form track paints gorgeous pictures of what it might be like to land on Titan and go exploring.

On his web site, Bert writes

Besides ambient sound-scapes he also terrorizes the so called “Berlin School” genre with his own approach of the sequencer-based electronic inventions.

He sometimes even uses an electric guitar or bass with layered effects, to make acid based guitar-noise. Besides his solo work Phrozenlight forms together with Eppie E Hulshoff (aka “Von Haulshoven”) the Dutch group “Dutch Space Mission”.

http://www.phrozenlight.nl/

===LUNA===

Lunar Effect – Dan Pound (2008)

9. Phase two – Dan Pound (7:29)
10. Phase three – Dan Pound (1:30)
11. Phase four – Dan Pound (12:04)
12. Phase five – Dan Pound (8:48)
13. Phase six – Dan Pound (4:57)
14. Phase seven – Dan Pound (3:53)
15. Phase eight – Dan Pound (5:01)
16. Phase nine – Dan Pound (5:33)

Dan Pound composes and produces ambient electronic, new age, world/shamanic, space-music soundscapes.

Dan was classically trained on piano, guitar and double bass at an early age and started writing songs soon after. He went on to be in the local honor orchestra and was soon writing pieces for the entire ensemble. Besides performing and composing, Dan has earned degrees in recording engineering and electronic music technology, and has received credits as 1st engineer and mixer for an indie jazz release, “Crusin’ Some Grooves” by the Steve Wolfe Quartet.

Over the last several years, Dan has developed a home project studio where he does most of his work now recording and producing his music independently. He specializes in music for film and multi-media, as well as recording and producing his own CD’s on his newly developed label, Pound Sounds.

His music has been used for Greenpeace’s documentary, “Changes in Climate, Changes in Lives”.

17. Luna – Chris Russell (7:07)
(Aralu, AtmoWorks, 2009)

Chris Russell has been recording ambient music since 2000. His music is influenced by nature, the future, the ebb and flow of life, conspiracy theories and hidden esoteric knowledge. In 2002, he did the soundtrack to a local indie horror film called 13, and he has worked with several bands including: Single File Suicide, Torn Skin, and Syntax Error. He started posting his solo music online in 2006 and released his first solo album, Aralu, on AtmoWorks in 2009.

The Aralu is a lost Babylonian underworld, conceived as a vast, dark underground cave, entered through a hole in the earth, guarded by seven doors to which souls go after death and give oracles to the living.

http://relaxedmachinery.com/artists/chris-russell/

18. Veil of the Twilight Moon – Alpha Wave Movement (10:48)
(Transcendence, Harmonic Resonance, 1995)

Alpha Wave Movement (established 1992) is the electronic music project of Gregory T. Kyryluk. Alpha Wave Movement’s musical style can be considered an amalgam of classic 1970s period German style electronic music otherwise known as “Berlin-school” and the ambient aesthetics of Brian Eno, Jonn Serrie and Steve Roach.

Alpha Wave Movement’s music is all electronic-based, utilizing digital synthesizers and MIDI to create its sonic explorations. Aside from the music influences nature and natural landscapes are a continuous source of inspiration for compositions.

http://www.last.fm/music/Alpha+Wave+Movement

19. Moon Illusion – Cleveland Wehle (15:05)
(Tranquility, Cleveland Wehle, 2008)

Keyboard artist Cleveland Wehle, a Virginia-based musician specializing in slow, natural and atmospheric ambient music, writes and records works that are calm and serene – and convey a deeply personal, a reflective and contemplative affect upon the listener.

http://www.amazon.com/Cleveland-Wehle/e/B001LI705S

20. Harvest Moon – Altus (13:47)
(Autumn Breeze, Altus Music, 2005)

Altus is Canadian composer Mike Carss, from Ottawa, in Ontario, Canada. Altus is another of those generous souls who provides nearly his entire body of work under Creative Commons, so it’s free for download.

His specialty is largely symphonic ambient music, lush and lyrical in his approach to the genre.

His work is available at http://altusmusic.ca/

(Image: Layers of haze covering Saturn’s satellite Titan are seen in this image taken by Voyager 1 on Nov. 12, 1980 at a range of 22,000 kilometers (13,700 miles). The colors are false and are used to show details of the haze that covers Titan. The upper level of the thick aerosol above the satellite’s limb appears orange. The divisions in the haze occur at altitudes of 200, 375 and 500 kilometers (124, 233 and 310 miles) above the limb of the moon. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA’s Office of Space Science.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s